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  • The impact of subsidized private health insurance and health facility upgrades on healthcare utilization and spending in rural Nigeria.

    Posted 2017-12-11 19:39:32 by: The HealthFolk Team

    Related Articles The impact of subsidized private health insurance and health facility upgrades on healthcare utilization and spending in rural Nigeria. Int J Health Econ Manag. 2017 Dec 08;: Authors: Gustafsson-Wright E, Popławska G, Tanović Z, van der Gaag J Abstract This paper analyzes the quantitative impact of an intervention that provides subsidized low-cost private health insurance together with health facility upgrades in Nigeria. The evaluation, which measures impact on healthcare utilization and spending, is based on a quasi-experimental design and utilizes three population-based household surveys over a 4-year period. After 4 years, the intervention increased healthcare use by 25.2 percentage points in the treatment area overall and by 17.7 percentage points among the insured. Utilization of modern healthcare facilities increased after 4 years by 20.4 percentage points in the treatment area and by 18.4 percentage points among the insured due to the intervention. After 2 years of program implementation, the intervention reduced healthcare spending by 51% compared with baseline, while after 4 years, spending resumed to pre-intervention levels. PMID: 29222608 [PubMed - as supplied by ...

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  • Low serum ferritin and G6PD deficiency as potential predictors of anaemia in pregnant women visiting Prime Care Hospital Enugu Nigeria.

    Posted 2017-12-11 19:39:32 by: The HealthFolk Team

    Related Articles Low serum ferritin and G6PD deficiency as potential predictors of anaemia in pregnant women visiting Prime Care Hospital Enugu Nigeria. BMC Res Notes. 2017 Dec 08;10(1):721 Authors: Engwa GA, Unaegbu M, Unachukwu MN, Njoku MC, Agbafor KN, Mbacham WF, Okoh A Abstract OBJECTIVES: Though iron deficiency is known to be a major risk factor of anaemia, the association of G6PD deficiency and malaria with anaemia still remains unclear. Hence, a cross-sectional study involving 95 pregnant women visiting Prime Care Hospital in Trans-Ekulu region of Enugu Nigeria was conducted to determine possible predictors of anaemia in pregnancy. RESULTS: The prevalence of anaemia, malaria and G6PD deficiency were 53.7, 12.6 and 60% respectively. Low serum ferritin (OR 5.500, CI 2.25-13.42, p < 0.05) and G6PD deficiency (OR 0.087, CI 0.03-0.23, p < 0.05) were associated with anaemia in pregnancy. On the other hand, malaria did not significantly associate (OR 1.184, CI 0.35-3.97, p = 0.964) with anaemia in pregnant women. These findings showed high prevalence of anaemia among pregnant women with low serum ferritin level and G6PD deficiency as high risk factors of anaemia. PMID: 29221497 [PubMed - in ...

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  • Elevated serum β2-microglobulin in individuals coinfected with hepatitis B and hepatitis D virus in a rural settings in Southwest Nigeria.

    Posted 2017-12-11 19:39:32 by: The HealthFolk Team

    Related Articles Elevated serum β2-microglobulin in individuals coinfected with hepatitis B and hepatitis D virus in a rural settings in Southwest Nigeria. BMC Res Notes. 2017 Dec 08;10(1):719 Authors: Okoror LE, Ajayi AO, Ijalana OB Abstract OBJECTIVE: Coinfection of hepatitis B virus (HBV) with hepatitis D virus (HDV) has being reported to increase severity of progression to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and liver cirrhosis (LC). Beta microglobulin (2βM) which is present on the surfaces of blood cells in acceptable levels is a tumor marker which may become elevated in disease conditions. This study hence observed the prevalence of HBV and HDV coinfection in a rural population and their 2βM concentration. RESULTS: Of the 368 samples, 66 (17.9%) were positive to hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and 33 (50%) were coinfected with HDV, 8 (2.1%) were monoinfected with HDV. 2βM concentration increased beyond the normal level in individuals coinfected with HBV and HDV as compared with the monoinfected individuals. Coinfection resulted in the increased concentration of 2βM in HBV and HDV coinfection and the likelihood of progression to HCC and LC may not be ruled out. Monoinfection with HDV also had high 2βM concentration but this is due to having being infected with a non-detected HBV or chronic infection in which HBV is clearing. PMID: 29221492 [PubMed - in ...

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  • Mapping the evidence on pharmacological interventions for non-affective psychosis in humanitarian non-specialised settings: a UNHCR clinical guidance

    Posted 2017-12-11 00:00:00 by: The HealthFolk Team

    Populations exposed to humanitarian emergencies are particularly vulnerable to mental health problems, including new onset, relapse and deterioration of psychotic disorders. Inadequate care for this group may ...

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  • Humanitarian and primary healthcare needs of refugee women and children in Afghanistan

    Posted 2017-12-11 00:00:00 by: The HealthFolk Team

    This Commentary describes the situation and healthcare needs of Afghans returning to their country of origin. With more than 600,000 Afghans returned from Pakistan and approximately 450,000 Afghans returned ...

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  • Individual, collective, and transgenerational traumatization in the Yazidi

    Posted 2017-12-11 00:00:00 by: The HealthFolk Team

    In recent years, Islamic terrorism has manifested itself with an unexpectedly destructive force. Despite the fact that Islamic terrorism commences locally in most cases, it has spread its terror worldwide. In ...

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  • nigeria[Title]; +16 new citations

    Posted 2017-12-10 01:39:29 by: The HealthFolk Team

    16 new pubmed citations were retrieved for your search. Click on the search hyperlink below to display the complete search results: nigeria[Title] These pubmed results were generated on 2017/12/09PubMed comprises more than millions of citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web ...

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  • [Correspondence] Health-care delivery for long-term survivors of childhood cancer

    Posted 2017-12-09 00:00:00 by: The HealthFolk Team

    In their Article in The Lancet (Dec 9, p 2569),1 Bhakta and colleagues provide compelling data and novel statistical analysis to quantify the overwhelming lifetime cumulative burden of chronic health conditions caused by curative paediatric cancer therapies. As a 27-year survivor of Hodgkin's lymphoma, I applaud the authors' suggestion that it might be time to rethink the methods by which we provide care for long-term childhood cancer survivors. As a patient, I have had numerous encounters over the past three decades that have left me frustrated by the scarcity of easy access to coordinated comprehensive care for ...

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  • [Review] The primary health-care system in China

    Posted 2017-12-09 00:00:00 by: The HealthFolk Team

    China has made remarkable progress in strengthening its primary health-care system. Nevertheless, the system still faces challenges in structural characteristics, incentives and policies, and quality of care, all of which diminish its preparedness to care for a fifth of the world's population, which is ageing and which has a growing prevalence of chronic non-communicable disease. These challenges include inadequate education and qualifications of its workforce, ageing and turnover of village doctors, fragmented health information technology systems, a paucity of digital data on everyday clinical practice, financial subsidies and incentives that do not encourage cost savings and good performance, insurance policies that hamper the efficiency of care delivery, an insufficient quality measurement and improvement system, and poor performance in the control of risk factors (such as hypertension and ...

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  • [Perspectives] Icarus

    Posted 2017-12-09 00:00:00 by: The HealthFolk Team

    When did the Middle Ages end? A traditional date is 1453, the fall of Byzantium. Another candidate is 1610, when Galileo reported that Jupiter had moons. But if a defining feature of the Middle Ages was transcendence—the belief that human beings are ultimately spiritual and that life on earth is a shadow of the heavenly life—then for some people, the Middle Ages ended with the collapse of great theocratic empires (Russia, China, the Ottoman Empire) and the advancement of secular ...

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